NOW:53146:USA01489
http://widgets.journalinteractive.com/cache/JIResponseCacher.ashx?duration=5&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdata.wp.myweather.net%2FeWxII%2F%3Fdata%3D*USA01489
37°
H 37° L 34°
Cloudy | 10MPH

Conservatively Speaking

State Senator Mary Lazich (R-New Berlin) represents parts of four counties: Milwaukee, Waukesha, Racine, and Walworth. Her Senate District 28 includes New Berlin, Franklin, Greendale, Hales Corners, Muskego, Waterford, Big Bend, the town of Vernon and parts of Greenfield, East Troy, and Mukwonago. Senator Lazich has been in the Legislature for more than a decade. She considers herself a tireless crusader for lower taxes, reduced spending and smaller government.

How you could spend $13 trillion

Economy


I have blogged in the past about the never-ending, ever-growing out of control U.S. Debt Clock, now at an astounding  $13.1 trillion.

How much is $13 trillion? What does it mean?

MSN Money puts the astronomical figure in perspective with ways the money could be spent:

“With $13 trillion, Americans could buy nine 32-gigabyte iPhones (the 3GS model) for every one of the 6.8 billion human beings on the planet, with a little money left over.

At $101,500 apiece, $13 trillion could buy Tesla Roadsters for 128 million lucky people. That's roughly the population of Japan.


Four years at Yale, including room and board, cost about $190,000 at today's prices. For $13 trillion, 68 million students could be sent to New Haven, Conn. That's 91% of the under-18 population of the country.

Thirteen trillion dollars could buy every person in the U.S. population of 309 million one item off McDonald’s dollar menu every day for the next 115 years. Doing the same for every one of the 6.8 billion people in the world, the money would last a little more than five years.”

There’s more.  

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools