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Conservatively Speaking

State Senator Mary Lazich (R-New Berlin) represents parts of four counties: Milwaukee, Waukesha, Racine, and Walworth. Her Senate District 28 includes New Berlin, Franklin, Greendale, Hales Corners, Muskego, Waterford, Big Bend, the town of Vernon and parts of Greenfield, East Troy, and Mukwonago. Senator Lazich has been in the Legislature for more than a decade. She considers herself a tireless crusader for lower taxes, reduced spending and smaller government.

Americans fear government health care weakens free enterprise

Government health care


According to the Gallup polling organization, the percentage of Americans believing the co
sts of health care will get worse under government control continues to increase. The percentage of Americans who think the cost will get better under government control stays the same, floundering at 22 percent.

Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute thinks the anger of Americans about the prospect of government health care goes beyond the sticker shock. Brooks makes the argument that the public is concerned about the danger to three areas: individual choice, personal accountability, and rewards for ambition.

Citizens worry at the thought that the choices they now enjoy may someday be gone and transferred to government bureaucrats. Brooks writes choices would be restricted in all phases of care:

“What kind of health insurance citizens can buy, what kind of doctors they can see, what kind of procedures their doctors will perform, what kind of drugs they can take, and what treatment options they may have.”

Many Americans covet the concept of personal responsibility, however the way government health care is designed, Brooks asserts people will balk at purchasing insurance until they need to do so.

Finally, Brooks worries that minus the incentive for medical professionals to earn money because of a series of government rules and regulations, critical medical discoveries of the future may not be achieved.

You can read Brooks’ column in the Wall Street Journal here. 

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