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Conservatively Speaking

State Senator Mary Lazich (R-New Berlin) represents parts of four counties: Milwaukee, Waukesha, Racine, and Walworth. Her Senate District 28 includes New Berlin, Franklin, Greendale, Hales Corners, Muskego, Waterford, Big Bend, the town of Vernon and parts of Greenfield, East Troy, and Mukwonago. Senator Lazich has been in the Legislature for more than a decade. She considers herself a tireless crusader for lower taxes, reduced spending and smaller government.

This is a good time to replace Old Glory


This time of the year you see many American flags proudly displayed, waving over government buildings, schools, business and homes. Some of those flags have seen better days, having suffered through cold wintry snow, bitter winds, and driving rain. This would be an appropriate time to consider replacing Old Glory with a new flag.

Replacing the Stars and Stripes means proper and respectful disposal of your old flag. The U.S. flag code states, "The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning." You may contact your local American Legion office to assist you in the disposal of your flag. Veteran’s organizations hold special ceremonies throughout the year to respectfully dispose of old flags with dignity and decorum.

Remember, the annual observance of Flag Day is June 14. On that day in 1777, the Continental Congress approved the design of a national flag. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation declaring June 14 Flag Day and ever since, Americans have commemorated the adoption of the Stars and Stripes by celebrating June 14 as Flag Day.

There are special rules to follow when displaying the flag. According to the U.S. flag code:

• It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed 24 hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.

• The flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously.

• The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.

• When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, balcony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half-staff.

• When the flag is suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending from a house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be hoisted out, union first, from the building.

• When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window, the flag should be displayed in the same way, with the union or blue field to the left of the observer in the street.

• The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.

• The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise.

• The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.

• The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free.

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