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College Dropout Scott Walker Gave Commencement Speech at Concordia University

Events

Last Friday (May 16),  Gov. Scott Walker, who lacks a college degree, gave a commencement speech at Concordia University in Mequon. 

Root River Siren blog says:

"Imagine sending your child to private college, 4 years of tuition, books and lodging, concluding with graduation day.  You rally the family for the commencement ceremony. Who will deliver the all important commencement address?  Governor Scott Walker, college dropout.

What?! Yes, Mom and Dad, Scott Walker is going to congratulate your child on completing something he failed to do: graduate from college."

According to the   Wisconsin State Journal article Scott Walker Compares Graduation to Zip Line Jump in Commencement Speech, Walker attended Marquette University in Milwaukee, but left in 1990 when he was 34 credit-hours short of completing his degree.   

34 credits?  Whew, that's a lot.

The WSJ article also conveys that  Walker told graduates to trust in themselves and their education.  His  23-minute commencement speech was sprinkled with biblical references and referred to politics only briefly.

One commenter to the online article posted the following:

"We attended the commencement last night at Concordia and what the article didn't mention is that Walker received a cool welcome and it appeared over half the audience sat there motionless during his whole speech with no applause. Walker even made a comment during the speech that he received a bigger applause at his state of the state speech when he talked about stocking more walleye in Wisconsin lakes. When he started quoting the bible and said that his self proclaimed preacher dad and religious mother taught him the most important thing in life is to do good for all people there were moans throughout the commencement hall. I heard a parent of one of graduates sitting behind me say what an insult to the students who worked so hard to earn their advanced degrees to have such a demonstrated hypocrite giving the key note speech on their special day of graduation. "

Walker mainly focused on his zip line analogy says the WSJ.  

I bet there was nothing in his speech about student debt or Wisconsin's " brain drain".

Regarding student debt, one commenter to a JSonline story about Walker's commencement speech remarked---

"Did Scott Walker mention that Republicans, in an attempt to avoid raising taxes on the 1%, thought it would be better instead to block a bill lowering interest rates on non-dischargeable student loan debt?"     

Read more about that issue at  politicususa

According to the Feb. 13, 2014 Wisconsin State Journal article Combatting the brain drain is the key to Wisconsin's growth, Conference Speaker Says,   people at the Governor's Conference on Economic Development were told that Wisconsin is experiencing a massive brain drain.

While the state’s population is rising about 0.5 percent a year, most of the growth is in people age 65 or older, he said. Each of the past five years, Wisconsin has lost 9,000 residents, ages 21 to 29, with college degrees.  Neighboring states, such as Minnesota and Illinois, are losing adults overall, but they are gaining college graduates in their early 20s, said Morris Davis (associate professor and academic director of the Graaskamp Center for Real Estate). 

And per (May 22, 2014) Milwaukee Community Journal: 

For the last decade, Wisconsin has been experiencing a "brain drain," with more college graduates leaving the state than staying.  One factor could be our crumbling transit infrastructure and lack of driving alternatives, according to "Driving Wisconsin's 'Brain Drain',  How Outdated Transportation Policies Undermine Wisconsin's Ability to Attract and Retain Talent for Tomorrow's Economic Prosperity."

The new WISPIRG Foundation survey revealed that most Wisconsin college students want the ability to get around without a car, and many may leave Wisconsin without that option. This demand starkly contrasts with Wisconsin transportation policies, which often favor extravagant highway expansion projects over critical transit upgrades.

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